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How to open the microwave and replace the CES6 20A fuse in order to restore the electrical circuit.

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  • replaced fuse in my panasonic microwave and now trips house breaker

Comments

Tim Dowd says:

3 min on a bit.OMG!

Freezo Origio says:

Keep it up. This info was very helpful.

Sonic Vision says:

Great post, but I can’t get the cover to secure back on on sides. I assume
they need to snap in some how but haven’t gotten them to yet.

Whisper to de Bebe says:

Exploding Panasonic microwave
http://youtu.be/qcP9n0qyTGs

Aaron Haugh says:

It’s a 10A. I’ll get a 20A and give it a go. Hopefully the microwave isn’t
toast!

917Davison says:

Great video, Doug. I replaced fuse easily. However, I must have another
problem. Microwave works heating water, but when I tried to open door,
microwave came back on until I closed the door again. Is there a switch to
replace on the door?

Aaron Haugh says:

Nah it blew again. I bought a 20A CERAMIC Quick Blow Fuse this time. Not
sure what to do now!

Aaron Haugh says:

Hey Doug. I was testing on a possible different circuit, tried the original
power socket where we used to have it and the same deal. Powers on but when
trying to microwave it goes dead. Fuse reads 250V 20A as you suggested (I’m
in NZ).

Doug Brown says:

What’s happening is that your circuits are overloaded. I don’t know your
electricity knowledge, but… Your circuit breaker controls the amount of
current that is supplied to each circuit. A circuit is simply the white
cable that runs from the central electricity supply to each outlet in your
house. Current is the max amount of “electricity” (not quite, but a good
enough definition) that the circuit can safely supply to all the devices on
the circuit. (Cont’d)

abi bhattarai says:

Thanks! You saved me $60! It was so easy because of your video. To everyone
else, make sure you get the proper fuse for your microwave. (The volts
should be 120v and the amps should be what ever your microwave amp is)

Doug Brown says:

(#3, cont’d) The combined current is now 5A + 16A = 21A and the circuit
breaker shuts off the supply of electricity. Now, first you should have
your microwave on its own circuit. An electrician can do this quite easily.
Second, if your entire house electricity shuts down that indicates quite a
serious miswiring and you definitely want an electrician to trace the
circuits from the breaker to each outlet, then safely rebalance the loads.
It’s not something you should attempt yourself! Good luck!

Doug Brown says:

That’s definitely your problem because microwaves typically draw @ 15A and
a 10A fuse will blow every time you use it.

Aaron Haugh says:

Thanks for your reply. This time I bought a 20A CERAMIC Quick Blow Fuse and
tried again. The microwave powered on but when trying to microwave
something it died straight away (without a bang this time)..

Freezo Origio says:

Thanks Doug Brown, I followed your guide and it helped me fix my GE
microwave.

Aaron Haugh says:

I took my blown fuse to a audio and electronics store and they gave me what
they thought was a matching fuse. The microwave powered on fine but when I
tried to microwave something it made a loud bang and now she’s dead
again…. Would that have wrecked the microwave for good or could I get
another fuse and try again? Thanks

Doug Brown says:

Hi, it’s the interlock switch. Please search in YouTube and Google for a
video on the subject and I’m sure you’ll find a good one!

Garima Sharma says:

Thanks for the video Doug! This really helped get my the microwave’s LED
lights and power up. However, now the issue is whenever I try to turn the
microwave ‘ON’, the power of my house goes out. i.e. the MCD trips. Do you
know if this is something to do with the fuse. I replaced the fuse with
another 120V-20 Amp fuse. Please suggest.

Doug Brown says:

(#4, cont”d) As a last note, if you’re using fuses instead of circuit
breaker, your house wiring is quite old because fuses went out of fashion
in new houses by the 1960s. It’s very likely that your house needs to be
rewired completely to get it safer and more usable.

Doug Brown says:

I would go for a 20A fuse. What’s the rating on the one you got?

Doug Brown says:

Glad to help. Good point on the fuse and I think I mentioned that for
microwaves you probably need to visit an appliance repair shop or a stereo
store. Home Depot and automotive stores sell ones that are rated for 10-15
amps max and you probably need 20+

austinque9 says:

Did the 20a work? It would be good to blow it out with compressed air.

Garima Sharma says:

Thankfully it’s not the entire house and just the circuit with refrigerator
on it. or the other circuit with AC on it. So, I understand the logic. Hope
it’s not the capacitor or transmitter that needs replacement. If so, I
would rather have to go for a new microwave instead. Thanks a lot for the
explanation Doug!

Doug Brown says:

Is the microwave on its own circuit, i.e. it has its own circuit breaker?
Or is it shared? If shared, see what else is on the circuit and move it to
another plug. If you’re not sure, can you put the microwave onto a plug
that’s definitely on its own circuit, like the fridge, temporarily? Then
see if the fuse still blows.

Doug Brown says:

(#2, cont’d) Look at the circuit breaker and you’ll see a bunch of 10s, 15s
and 20s, which is the max current (expressed in amps, e.g, 10A) available
to all devices on the circuit. A microwave uses a lot of current and is
typically on its own circuit, usually a 20A circuit. In your case, there
must be other devices on the same circuit, like a light switch or an
outlet. If the other devices on the microwave are switched on and using say
5A, then the microwave (at say 16A) will trip the breaker.

boowonder888 says:

I bougt a replacement “clear “fuse . It didnt blow out, but the microwave
is still completely dead. Any ideas what else the problem could be?

Doug Brown says:

There’s something else that’s triggering excessive current to be drawn
through that fuse. Now you’re getting into a more complicated set of tests
that require voltmeters and things. I found this article that describes
problems with the door switch, fan, etc. and note I added space bars
between the link so I could post it. If you’re really handy you have a good
chance of DIY, but you may have to get a service call! ww w doityourself.
com/ stry/ repairmicrowave #b

Doug Brown says:

Thanks James for responding to Boowonder. I would test the fuse (do you
have a multimeter?) and just make sure that’s not the problem for sure.
Otherwise, that’s as far as I can help you. Sorry about that.

james42519 says:

i have a ge microwave and it has power power and when i tested fuse it
tested good it seems. i also found there is a schematic and repair thing in
a envelope whe you open it. there is a flow chart and it says if there is
no power check the flame sensor and xfmr. i can’t check now so don’t know
about those.

Doug Brown says:

Super, glad to help out and save you some $.

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